lenora_rose: Happy JoJo @ 2.3333 (YAAAY3)
While I can't quite give it as high an acclaim as [livejournal.com profile] matociquala, the Last Unicorn has a pretty strong place of honour in my childhood formative experiences. I showed the movie for both my seventh and eighth birthdays (I think. Might have been eighth and ninth) by accident, and while I was a bit embarrassed at the gaffe, I also couldn't understand why my friend was complaining. I cannot at this late date say whether I read the book before or after seeing the movie, but it was definitely in close proximity, though I think I understood the book and the differences better ... later.

I've rewatched the movie semi-regularly since, rather quirky German-peasant animation style and all. I got seriously peeved when, in my sixth-grade year or so, a second grader got into the creative writing anthology our school division put out by literally rewriting the plot of the movie in a single short paragraph, because obviously the teacher should have KNOWN it wasn't original. (Where I was writing, seriously, a fantasy-based tragic melodrama.) And I had some distinct stretches of being All About Unicorns. These days, I try to restrain that, partly because of some of the associations that have attached themselves to unicorns with rainbows and hearts and My Little Pony pastels and sentiments**. (Although a longtime favourite sweater has unicorns, hearts and flowers on it, and pastel pink and purple touches, it's partly so because it looks nothing like that description probably made you imagine. And if I'd been thinking straight, I'd have been wearing it on Monday. oh, well.)

The last time I reread the book was February or March somewhere. I hadn't in some years, and I kept thinking I should. And the writing, oh god, the poetry. Yes, the book is as good as they say.

And the germinating seed for the Pretty Little Horses mural, before I ended up going in an actual horsey direction, was wondering if it was even possible to make a giant unicorn mural and not have it be considered girly. I thought a good starting place would be basing the unicorn directly on a warhorse or a workhorse, something big and not at all dainty, and probably brown or bay. This is enough against my personal conceptions of unicorns that I ended up with actual horses.

Monday Night was the Winnipeg stop in the Last Unicorn Tour, showing the film in full theatre and with Peter S. Beagle present to talk about it, and anything else his fans want to ask.

Officially it was a sold out show. Less officially, they ended up moving it to a bigger theatre and could have fit some extra people (Sorry, [livejournal.com profile] senekal, I didn't know in time to reach you). I arrived late enough that even without having had supper I opted to stay in my seat and not vanish to hunt nibbles.

I went, and met up with some friends there.

The talk was entertaining. I asked something I've occasionally wondered before, which was whether Beagle, who is a musician, had ever considered putting his own songs and lyrics into the movie, since they run throughout the book and even get the last word. The answer was that he was just so grateful that instead of the guy in charge of the studio doing it himself like usual (With the obvious expected results re: quality) they'd gotten a professional musician he respected to write for the movie. Which, fair enough. It's not like the music is, oh, Ladyhawke... even though Mia Farrow cannot pull off her song, I LOVE the main theme, and I like some of the other songs and the majority of the incidental music. But I always thought Beagle's own lyrics would have been an even quirkier counterpoint. Especially as a cure for the "standard love song" trope.

I liked better his added admission that the lyrics, as well as being his nod to Tolkien in existing at all, were also the one part of the book he actively enjoyed writing.

My favourite answer from the Q&A was actually Peter's admission that there's exactly one character in the book based on a real person, and it's the only time he has ever done it as such; the butterfly is based on himself. (I know exactly how those sorts of random-association song sets can go...)

I also liked his description of starting the first draft of the book.

Then they had a draw for a bunch of swag. Being the oldest among my friends, I was the fan for the longest. But for various reasons, when the draw came up, I was cheering for [personal profile] leonacarver. Partly because really I don't need a lot more swag, and partly just because she's awesome (I would have been just as pleased for A or T... I think in all honesty I was prioritizing writer over artists because Beagle is also a writer, though he said later he's from a rather artistic family). So when the final prize came up, a t-shirt whose detail was kept hidden, and also involves ending up down by the stage getting your picture taken with Peter, I was genuinely startled to have my number called.

(Squee!) I e-mailed after the fact to ask if I could get a copy of the picture. I probably look horrid, but hey.

So the story behind the shirt is as follows: apparently, until Peter S. Beagle wrote the line "The Unicorn lived in a lilac wood, and she lived all alone." they can find No Record of anyone else who'd ever written about a FEMALE unicorn.

Of course, these days, as I noted above, the unicorn as feminine thing is ubiquitous, painfully so.** Thus:
cut for some large photos, some more blather and the twice-referenced footnote. )
lenora_rose: (Default)
So Lots of December to post about. So what do I do instead?

Link to a piece of Firefly Fanfic.

I started this mostly intending it for [livejournal.com profile] forodwaith, back in 2012, around the tiem I started Imaginary Colours. I jammed because of the longer story, and because I couldn't edit it to my satisfaction. I'm still not satisfied, but hey, it's a fanfic of less than a thousand words. It might as well go live.

A Name To Believe In (764 words) by Lenora_Rose
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Firefly
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings
Relationships: Jayne Cobb/Minor Series Character (Unnamed)
Summary:

After Jayne Cobb leaves, Canton tries to reconcile itself.



Sadly, it doesn't count towards my current Coffee Words.

Which, since I don't think it made it to LJ/DW, my pledge, started in mid-December and whose deadline is basically when I finish Labyrinth, however long that is (And whether or not I turn to another project meantime, and I'm thinking about a short fiction...) is I'm allowed one coffee style drink - lattes, etc - per 5k words of new fiction, and I made this pledge while drinking the one I decided counted *for* the 5k mark, so I get my first real one at 10k. I'm at 7670 words right now since I made the pledge, a lot slower than my NaNoWriMo rate, but in spite of all the other seasonal sweets recently nommed and the absurd number and flavour of teas I recently acquired or will soon, I'm also rather getting a craving. I fully intend to be able to get a coffee by somewhere in the weekend.
lenora_rose: (Roman Gossips)
Thanks to Its_in_the_water, I'm now set up on AO3. (As is Imaginary Colours).

Having a place to post fannish works maybe means I should finish a Firefly not-so-drabble that was once promised to forodwaith.

Anyhow, here I am, with my predictable user name of Lenora_rose. Nope, not hiding my fanfic association, such as it is, from my original fiction.

I also bookmarked some stuff (Some of astolat's stories of which I was most fond, in one case in spite of being in completely and utterly the wrong fandom for me, one by prairiecrow - so far - and one series someone else recced that I haven't gotten around to.) I think this feature might be much more useful to me overall than the ability to post my fanfic in one more place to be ignored.

Anyhow, if anyone is on there under a name I don't know, do tell me.
lenora_rose: (Labyrinth)
Christmas and related stuff is good so far, even if our hours have been somewhat curtailed in many cases by JoJo (tonight for instance, I forgot to pack his dinner, so we returned home probably 2 hours or so sooner than we might have) and twice by Colin's allergy to dogs (At least one person had taken it into consideration in her planning, but of course that was the day he forgot to medicate first). We got to do video chats with both Colin's family (As per last post) and my dad and stepmother in Edmonton, so they saw Joseph.

Of course, Joseph refused to show any interest in tearing paper off his presents - he had some in playing around in the box full of tissue-paper, but since his first attempt to get out of it involved a slip-and-fall right onto his face, I've been a bit cautious. So far he's only mildly curious about the drawing stuff, as I expected.

My presents were nice to awesome; the last 3 Harry Potter movies (I still haven't watched either Deathly hallows), the first two seasons of Community, the Piano Guys' self-titled CD, and a lot of socks and leggings. The oddity was one of the really fancy ocllectors editions of the Sound of Music, which i ahven't seen since I was tiny, so i don't know whether it's a movie to my taste, but I am usually a fan of musicals. I'm still guilty of some Boxing Day shopping (I didn't get Libriomancer, so there's that, plus my usual legal MP3 source finally got Deserters, the Oysterband album I only had on cassette, so i snagged that and three different album deals for under $3.00 each.)

But this is why I'm posting - why I'm awake to post. Imaginary Colours is done. For now. I expect I'll discover 1500 or so things wrong with it, especially the ending. This is MUCH closer to first draft than I would send to a publisher if this weren't, in the end, Fanfic. I can already guess that if I did a revised draft it would lose as much as 1000 words, and I'm not entirely happy with the name (I'm considering 'the Scent of Lilac' as the alternate). But I killed the things that made me the most unhappy.

Imaginary Colours )
lenora_rose: (Roman Gossips)
This is all [livejournal.com profile] shweta_narayan's fault (In a very good way.

I hadn't been reading anything of [livejournal.com profile] ursulav except the occasional comment on a mutually read other journal. Turns out I was missing a lot.

First of all, there's Digger, which is not only one of the best fantasy webcomics I've met in a long time (I laughed and wanted to cry on the same page, in the very best way, several times), featuring a no-nonsense wombat as its least likely heroine -- it's also a completed story, so there's none of the heartbreaking waiting I've encountered with others.

(Although I have to say, reading through the climax and finale while simultaneously refreshing and waiting for the next installment of an extremely tense day -- the prisoner of Azkaban climax - on alternity* was.... hard on the nerves.)

But while Digger is the best reward ever for looking at someone's journal and work and thinking Hmm, and while I quite like a lot of the art she displays on her site, the thing that Shweta used to first catch peoples' attention, and which made me decide I had to look further, were these tidbits ursulav swears ... well, as you can tell from two of the first three titles:

Excerpt From The Regency Novel I Will Never Write

Damnit. (Aka, Ninjas and Urchins)

More Excerpts from the Regency Novel That Seriously, No, I Will Never Write, I’m Not Kidding

Nothing in his experience, however, had ever prepared him for the discovery that a young lady of his acquaintance was a ninja.

Rooftops


_____________

* I don't recommend trying to read two emotionally wrenching moments in two long-running stories at once. Actually, I don't usually recommend trying to pay any attention whatsoever to two stories at once. But for a while, teh internets were being atypically slow to load new pages, so reading a new page/comment on one while the other was spinning actually severely cut down on the frustration. I stopped once the computer settled down, because some focus is nice...

And since I usually have three or more storylines, my own and others', going through my head, I'm atypically adapted to being able to switch gears fast. And I can reread both slower later, now I know the answer to the OMG WHAT HAPPENS?
lenora_rose: (Wheee!)
It's tempting to just use my last Oysterband concert post to cover this one, with editorial notes on changes in set list and the like.

But that wouldn't be quite right.

First, the West end Cultural Centre has been totally redone, and I really like the new look. The acoustics are beytter, and they have a balcony area. (Not that i remotely considered sitting there. Mom was actually not sick, so this makes the first time she's actually been able to see them (Having been ill at both folk fest and their last WECC concert.)

The opening act was dubbed Leonard Podaluk and friends on the posters, and they called themselves Trad, though they admitted they were searching for another name. The trio included Leonard and another guy from the Duhks, plus Nathan Rogers. And... wow. Nathan not only has a fabulous voice, proven on the two more trad-like songs they sang, but also can do throat singing, which he proved on a killer instrumental combo; where he rocked up throat singing as much as I've ever heard it rocked. Leonard Podaluk is one of the few people who can make a banjo sound good, and he did. The third guy had some pretty nice guitar licks, too, and I feel badly for missing his name.

Nathan Rogers' family actually sat in front of us, though the 2-3 year old daughter spent most of her time during their set (And a lot of Oysterband) on the dance floor.

They only did four songs, but they had me interested in the first sung thing (By J.P. Cormier, they said), and the instrumental sold me. The rest just solidified it. I want to see what their album will be like.

Oysterband were themselves; and that's always a good thing. I was on the dance floor from the start this time (Native Son). And as last time, they ended by descending from the stage (Except for fiddler Ian Telfer, who had one leg in a cast, having damaged his achilles tendon - according to singer/melodeon player John Jones, from jumping off a stage.) and playing a truly acoustic version of Put Out the Lights.

And this time, they came out, so I could get things signed. So naturally, i forgot holy Bandits at home. Mom bought herself a copy of the concert DVD, though, so we agreed I could get it signed, and swap with her. (Ian Telfer, for the same reason as above, just made his way backstage, and Dil Davies, the drummer form 2008-onward didn't sign it because he wasn't with them yet at that point.) SQuee!

As last time, this is the set list split by album, not in actual performed order.

From the Oxford Girl and Other Stories (An acoustic revamp of old material, mostly):
-What Wondrous Love is This? (With some drums absent from the album)
-The Oxford Girl (Very specifically derived from this version, not the other three studio ones.)

From Meet You There:
-Over the Water
-Here Comes the Flood (More like the album version than last time)
-Where the World Divides
-Walking Down the Road With You
-Bury Me Standing
-Dancing as Fast as I Can (Still one of my all-time favourites.)

From Rise Above:
-Uncommercial Song
-My Mouth
-Blackwaterside

From Deep Dark Ocean:
-Native Son (With the welsh opening verse)
-Milford Haven

From The Shouting End of Life:
-By Northern Light (Again, the fast version, but again, introduced with a slow fiddle bit)
-Put out the Lights (the closer, as I said.)
-The World Turned Upside Down. (which they seemed to think they hadn't done here before, but which is on my list from last time.)

From Holy Bandits:
-When I'm Up I can't Get down. (Which I guessed too late would once again segue into Granite Years, so took part of it easy.)

From Deserters:
-Granite Years (The song that hooked me on them.)
- We Could Leave Right Now (The one song I still remember somewhat of how they performed it, not just that they performed it, from 1994.)

Albums I think they missed entire:
Here I Stand
Wide Blue Yonder (Barring the sort of complicated nature of Oxford Girl)
Step Outside
Ride
25
the pre-history.

Tracks I wished they'd played but they didn't:
Rise Above (How on earth do they keep missing this one? It's another utter favourite)
False Knight on the Road (I still prefer the piano version from an obscure single over the
Never Left (If they're revamping old work... this or Gamblers would be interesting to hear in new variants)

Songs I couldn't actually sing along with in their entirety:
Walking Down the Road With You. (Oops.)
(This may not be reflective exclusively of my fondness for the band. I memorize music lyrics very fast indeed, and retain them a long time.)

Songs I didn't dance to:
The Oxford Girl.

(Number of Oysterband tracks on my current MP3 playlist: 4 out of 160+. But that's because it's mostly new material.)
lenora_rose: (Wheee!)
It's tempting to just use my last Oysterband concert post to cover this one, with editorial notes on changes in set list and the like.

But that wouldn't be quite right.

First, the West end Cultural Centre has been totally redone, and I really like the new look. The acoustics are beytter, and they have a balcony area. (Not that i remotely considered sitting there. Mom was actually not sick, so this makes the first time she's actually been able to see them (Having been ill at both folk fest and their last WECC concert.)

The opening act was dubbed Leonard Podaluk and friends on the posters, and they called themselves Trad, though they admitted they were searching for another name. The trio included Leonard and another guy from the Duhks, plus Nathan Rogers. And... wow. Nathan not only has a fabulous voice, proven on the two more trad-like songs they sang, but also can do throat singing, which he proved on a killer instrumental combo; where he rocked up throat singing as much as I've ever heard it rocked. Leonard Podaluk is one of the few people who can make a banjo sound good, and he did. The third guy had some pretty nice guitar licks, too, and I feel badly for missing his name.

Nathan Rogers' family actually sat in front of us, though the 2-3 year old daughter spent most of her time during their set (And a lot of Oysterband) on the dance floor.

They only did four songs, but they had me interested in the first sung thing (By J.P. Cormier, they said), and the instrumental sold me. The rest just solidified it. I want to see what their album will be like.

Oysterband were themselves; and that's always a good thing. I was on the dance floor from the start this time (Native Son). And as last time, they ended by descending from the stage (Except for fiddler Ian Telfer, who had one leg in a cast, having damaged his achilles tendon - according to singer/melodeon player John Jones, from jumping off a stage.) and playing a truly acoustic version of Put Out the Lights.

And this time, they came out, so I could get things signed. So naturally, i forgot holy Bandits at home. Mom bought herself a copy of the concert DVD, though, so we agreed I could get it signed, and swap with her. (Ian Telfer, for the same reason as above, just made his way backstage, and Dil Davies, the drummer form 2008-onward didn't sign it because he wasn't with them yet at that point.) SQuee!

As last time, this is the set list split by album, not in actual performed order.

From the Oxford Girl and Other Stories (An acoustic revamp of old material, mostly):
-What Wondrous Love is This? (With some drums absent from the album)
-The Oxford Girl (Very specifically derived from this version, not the other three studio ones.)

From Meet You There:
-Over the Water
-Here Comes the Flood (More like the album version than last time)
-Where the World Divides
-Walking Down the Road With You
-Bury Me Standing
-Dancing as Fast as I Can (Still one of my all-time favourites.)

From Rise Above:
-Uncommercial Song
-My Mouth
-Blackwaterside

From Deep Dark Ocean:
-Native Son (With the welsh opening verse)
-Milford Haven

From The Shouting End of Life:
-By Northern Light (Again, the fast version, but again, introduced with a slow fiddle bit)
-Put out the Lights (the closer, as I said.)
-The World Turned Upside Down. (which they seemed to think they hadn't done here before, but which is on my list from last time.)

From Holy Bandits:
-When I'm Up I can't Get down. (Which I guessed too late would once again segue into Granite Years, so took part of it easy.)

From Deserters:
-Granite Years (The song that hooked me on them.)
- We Could Leave Right Now (The one song I still remember somewhat of how they performed it, not just that they performed it, from 1994.)

Albums I think they missed entire:
Here I Stand
Wide Blue Yonder (Barring the sort of complicated nature of Oxford Girl)
Step Outside
Ride
25
the pre-history.

Tracks I wished they'd played but they didn't:
Rise Above (How on earth do they keep missing this one? It's another utter favourite)
False Knight on the Road (I still prefer the piano version from an obscure single over the
Never Left (If they're revamping old work... this or Gamblers would be interesting to hear in new variants)

Songs I couldn't actually sing along with in their entirety:
Walking Down the Road With You. (Oops.)
(This may not be reflective exclusively of my fondness for the band. I memorize music lyrics very fast indeed, and retain them a long time.)

Songs I didn't dance to:
The Oxford Girl.

(Number of Oysterband tracks on my current MP3 playlist: 4 out of 160+. But that's because it's mostly new material.)
lenora_rose: (Wheee!)
So I kind of want to do an entry on Keycon, though it's now two weekends back, and on puttering around the Doors Open events last Saturday and playing tourist in my own home town, and I have a few book reviews to write (Georgette Heyer maybe, and Brandon Sanderson definitely).

But I keep not being on the computer, or not being on it for nearly long enough to catch up on everything (In fact, i think I did more writing in notebook this last while than onscreen, and rather too much has been Armageddon stuff not Serpent or Soldier stuff.) So entry updates ent by the wayside.

But here's some good news that ought not wait any longer:

I have a wheel!

(SQUEE!)

Colin spotted it on kijiji, for the price of $235. It's an old-fashioned pottery wheel, motorized but with a flywheel rather than a pedal. On the one hand, this means the motor is one speed, (And the motor is loud, especially when the rubber turner hits the flywheel) but unlike a modern pedal, you don't need to keep the pedal down to keep the wheel spinning.

I have used the like before, but not since my first time though university (even though the university still has a few of similar kind). But it's easily near enough the style I have been using that I can adapt, and noticeably less than a quarter the price. And in spite of being aged and therefore liable to be cranky (Things I've noticed already: the rubber stopper of the splash tray is likely a lost cause, in that it won't come out, the pedal is weirdly high, the wheelhead is designed exclusively for use with a pottery bat*) it does seem to be in good condition.

I haven't had the chance to try it yet; I only just cleaned off the detritus from sitting in storage today. It's currently sitting in the middle of our kitchen while we try to figure out how to get the whole heavy weight of it into the basement, and not incidentally, where to put it once it's there, since Colin's Tardis-building** takes up rather more room than most woodworking projects. But getting it anywhere downstairs would open up options to try it out, so to speak. I just don't think spraying clay over the kitchen would be a good idea.

While, technically, my next projects-in-mind don't require a wheel, the nice thing about a wheel is, you can just decide you want to throw shapes, and you don't always have to have specific project goals in mind when you start. (And TWO people have asked me about mug commissions recently, and I others have asked about sundry general ideas in the past.)

And , well, SQUEEEE!

* A removable, usually wooden, flat disc, not the other kinds of bat
** Alas, a non-functional Tardis. Or rather, a police-box shaped shed.
lenora_rose: (Wheee!)
So I kind of want to do an entry on Keycon, though it's now two weekends back, and on puttering around the Doors Open events last Saturday and playing tourist in my own home town, and I have a few book reviews to write (Georgette Heyer maybe, and Brandon Sanderson definitely).

But I keep not being on the computer, or not being on it for nearly long enough to catch up on everything (In fact, i think I did more writing in notebook this last while than onscreen, and rather too much has been Armageddon stuff not Serpent or Soldier stuff.) So entry updates ent by the wayside.

But here's some good news that ought not wait any longer:

I have a wheel!

(SQUEE!)

Colin spotted it on kijiji, for the price of $235. It's an old-fashioned pottery wheel, motorized but with a flywheel rather than a pedal. On the one hand, this means the motor is one speed, (And the motor is loud, especially when the rubber turner hits the flywheel) but unlike a modern pedal, you don't need to keep the pedal down to keep the wheel spinning.

I have used the like before, but not since my first time though university (even though the university still has a few of similar kind). But it's easily near enough the style I have been using that I can adapt, and noticeably less than a quarter the price. And in spite of being aged and therefore liable to be cranky (Things I've noticed already: the rubber stopper of the splash tray is likely a lost cause, in that it won't come out, the pedal is weirdly high, the wheelhead is designed exclusively for use with a pottery bat*) it does seem to be in good condition.

I haven't had the chance to try it yet; I only just cleaned off the detritus from sitting in storage today. It's currently sitting in the middle of our kitchen while we try to figure out how to get the whole heavy weight of it into the basement, and not incidentally, where to put it once it's there, since Colin's Tardis-building** takes up rather more room than most woodworking projects. But getting it anywhere downstairs would open up options to try it out, so to speak. I just don't think spraying clay over the kitchen would be a good idea.

While, technically, my next projects-in-mind don't require a wheel, the nice thing about a wheel is, you can just decide you want to throw shapes, and you don't always have to have specific project goals in mind when you start. (And TWO people have asked me about mug commissions recently, and I others have asked about sundry general ideas in the past.)

And , well, SQUEEEE!

* A removable, usually wooden, flat disc, not the other kinds of bat
** Alas, a non-functional Tardis. Or rather, a police-box shaped shed.
lenora_rose: (Esther Falkner)
IT'S BACK for season two! My favourite tv show ever (even though it isn't a tv show and I've never managed to WATCH an episode.)

Not enough Falkner yet (See icon.) But a damn good start otherwise.

Lots of Hafidha doing slightly creepy internet things. Lots and lots of Daphne and Todd. A visible hole where one team-mate isn't. Much Squee!

It makes a reasonable entry point for people who missed season one (though the cumulative effect of reading Season one without knowing the end result is rather more powerful, and I'd advise starting here, at the beginning of season one, if you haven't. Consider it this way; they're doing the episodes once a month this seasons. That leaves lots and lots of reading time...


(In other news, I have a really horrible feeling throat infection plus body ache. Not so bad now the Tylenol kicked in, but I'm going nowhere today, cancelled my dental appointment tomorrow, and am waiting to see how well or quickly I recover to decide whether to call in sick to work, also tomorrow, go in only for the half a day scheduled (Due to same dental appointment, or pull a full day (I need the money, they need the hands. Making everyone sick is unkind, though I'm often very good about the whole wash hands/use disinfectant/don't cough near people thing, and I am thankfully several steps removed from contact with actual patients.)
lenora_rose: (Esther Falkner)
IT'S BACK for season two! My favourite tv show ever (even though it isn't a tv show and I've never managed to WATCH an episode.)

Not enough Falkner yet (See icon.) But a damn good start otherwise.

Lots of Hafidha doing slightly creepy internet things. Lots and lots of Daphne and Todd. A visible hole where one team-mate isn't. Much Squee!

It makes a reasonable entry point for people who missed season one (though the cumulative effect of reading Season one without knowing the end result is rather more powerful, and I'd advise starting here, at the beginning of season one, if you haven't. Consider it this way; they're doing the episodes once a month this seasons. That leaves lots and lots of reading time...


(In other news, I have a really horrible feeling throat infection plus body ache. Not so bad now the Tylenol kicked in, but I'm going nowhere today, cancelled my dental appointment tomorrow, and am waiting to see how well or quickly I recover to decide whether to call in sick to work, also tomorrow, go in only for the half a day scheduled (Due to same dental appointment, or pull a full day (I need the money, they need the hands. Making everyone sick is unkind, though I'm often very good about the whole wash hands/use disinfectant/don't cough near people thing, and I am thankfully several steps removed from contact with actual patients.)
lenora_rose: (Labyrinth)
Initial, and, at the rate I've been posting lately, likely to be only posted thoughts on World Fantasy Convention in Calgary.

- the people we were staying with (SCA names Morrigan and Dalton) are LOVELY. I liked them before, when we met them at their archery event and at Quad Wars, but they were excellent hosts, excellent people, etc.

- I've been told that people mind the whole issue of getting to and from a convention if not on site. I guess it's easier when you're a 20-30 minute walk away. Admittedly, the one night I wasn't going home earlier in the evening or getting picked up, I had to taxi it, but the fare was pretty cheap. Had I been doing less visiting with relatives or arching, I might see the issue. But the morning walk was a good start to the day.

- I want to go back to the Calgary archery range. Muchly. Even though when I went I was insufficiently fed, tired, stressed, self-conscious about my poor showing in archery lately, and more self-conscious when I proved it. (I did eventually relax into the shooting somewhat.)

- [livejournal.com profile] vilashna, EVERYBODY says hi. I may pass on more news and comments when we see each other next.

- WHAT WAS I THINKING, bringing three books to read for the trip? True enough, I might have needed one for the way there (Though I ended up reading for none of the travel time and not much of the hotel). But grabbing two more for during and the trip back is kind of.... forgetting the giant bag of swag, never mind the fact that i near doubled it with purchases. (More of the purchases were paperback, or used. i even got one book for 25 cents, though that was at a cafe in the neighbourhood, not a WFC vendor).

- It was decidedly odd going to a convention and realising I was almost entirely there in my capacity as artist. True enough, I went to readings as a fan and panels as an aspiring writer, sort of, though I drew through several of them. But I mostly ended up talking to artists, made most of my new acquaintances among the artists (Hardly a complaint, as this included some exceedingly nice people), talking about art, etc. I was explicitly invited to at least one convention, in Surrey, as an artist. Even though Colin and I agree that SFF cons are not the best (Or at least should not be the exclusive) places for me to sell my style of art.

- I sold ten pieces total. Not too bad. It may pay for the fees to get in. One of them was even an undecorated, non fantasy-related bowl.

- I spent considerably more than that. There is a disadvantage to not having to spend on hotel fees, even as there is an advantage. I went a little overboard on my intended budget on book-buying, but not badly, pounced on one cd in my single wander through the mall (Killing time until the awards Sunday, as I was not in the banquet). And then I bought waaay too much art (Two pieces, but the price tag of the second was about my total intended budget for frivolous purchases. Shaun Tan's art practically made me swoon.) But I was saddened, as nobody had Ink and Steel.

- I amused Minister Faust (after his fabulous, dynamic reading) and some other Edmontonians with my observation that Winnipeg is a crow city, while Edmonton (and Calgary) are magpie cities.

- Patricia McKillip is a lovely person, as far as I could tell, as well as a lovely writer, but not a terribly interesting panelist.

- Of people I've known online, I met Patrice Sarath and Lucy A. Snyder ([livejournal.com profile] las). Of people I've met at prior events, Guy Gavriel Kay seemed to have no idea who I was (But I said directly that I expected him not to.)

- One thing that irritated me that i saw in at least two panels. If people are attempting to discuss a general trend in fantasy books (or, presumably, sf books, horror books, fantasy art, sf art, etc.) which you feel you are personally an exception to? DO NOT DISMISS THE ENTIRE TREND AS THEREFORE NONEXISTANT OR A NON-ISSUE. You are not the be-all and end-all of Fantasy. No matter who you are. (And while George R.R. Martin once did this to a degree, I wouldn't have noticed as much had I not been sensitized to it by seeing it in others. The author who made the most blatant example of this was... not in that league for sales or reputation. Not a nobody, either, a decent-selling author with multiple books, but even so.)

- Not much real music: The one music related thing started off with a number of people doing Lord of the Rings filks to "Once More, with Feeling" tunes (The first "I'll never tell" variant, with Legolas and Gimli, was at least funny, and the girl Maja who sang Gollum's bit had a pretty good soprano, though she wobbled a bit without accompaniment. Then Martin Springett did a few songs, starting Lord of the Rings and wandering off into other territory. He's a truly talented guitarist, a decent singer, and a songwriter of some skill, though I have to admit, his style is not to my personal taste, so I'm not likely to buy a cd. But it broke up without ever opening up.

- I didn't practice nearly enough on the Angry Chicken, though I did get some practice time in. And I won't do much tonight, either, as I am tired and it is time to sleep. Sorry, Abacchus.
lenora_rose: (Labyrinth)
Initial, and, at the rate I've been posting lately, likely to be only posted thoughts on World Fantasy Convention in Calgary.

- the people we were staying with (SCA names Morrigan and Dalton) are LOVELY. I liked them before, when we met them at their archery event and at Quad Wars, but they were excellent hosts, excellent people, etc.

- I've been told that people mind the whole issue of getting to and from a convention if not on site. I guess it's easier when you're a 20-30 minute walk away. Admittedly, the one night I wasn't going home earlier in the evening or getting picked up, I had to taxi it, but the fare was pretty cheap. Had I been doing less visiting with relatives or arching, I might see the issue. But the morning walk was a good start to the day.

- I want to go back to the Calgary archery range. Muchly. Even though when I went I was insufficiently fed, tired, stressed, self-conscious about my poor showing in archery lately, and more self-conscious when I proved it. (I did eventually relax into the shooting somewhat.)

- [livejournal.com profile] vilashna, EVERYBODY says hi. I may pass on more news and comments when we see each other next.

- WHAT WAS I THINKING, bringing three books to read for the trip? True enough, I might have needed one for the way there (Though I ended up reading for none of the travel time and not much of the hotel). But grabbing two more for during and the trip back is kind of.... forgetting the giant bag of swag, never mind the fact that i near doubled it with purchases. (More of the purchases were paperback, or used. i even got one book for 25 cents, though that was at a cafe in the neighbourhood, not a WFC vendor).

- It was decidedly odd going to a convention and realising I was almost entirely there in my capacity as artist. True enough, I went to readings as a fan and panels as an aspiring writer, sort of, though I drew through several of them. But I mostly ended up talking to artists, made most of my new acquaintances among the artists (Hardly a complaint, as this included some exceedingly nice people), talking about art, etc. I was explicitly invited to at least one convention, in Surrey, as an artist. Even though Colin and I agree that SFF cons are not the best (Or at least should not be the exclusive) places for me to sell my style of art.

- I sold ten pieces total. Not too bad. It may pay for the fees to get in. One of them was even an undecorated, non fantasy-related bowl.

- I spent considerably more than that. There is a disadvantage to not having to spend on hotel fees, even as there is an advantage. I went a little overboard on my intended budget on book-buying, but not badly, pounced on one cd in my single wander through the mall (Killing time until the awards Sunday, as I was not in the banquet). And then I bought waaay too much art (Two pieces, but the price tag of the second was about my total intended budget for frivolous purchases. Shaun Tan's art practically made me swoon.) But I was saddened, as nobody had Ink and Steel.

- I amused Minister Faust (after his fabulous, dynamic reading) and some other Edmontonians with my observation that Winnipeg is a crow city, while Edmonton (and Calgary) are magpie cities.

- Patricia McKillip is a lovely person, as far as I could tell, as well as a lovely writer, but not a terribly interesting panelist.

- Of people I've known online, I met Patrice Sarath and Lucy A. Snyder ([livejournal.com profile] las). Of people I've met at prior events, Guy Gavriel Kay seemed to have no idea who I was (But I said directly that I expected him not to.)

- One thing that irritated me that i saw in at least two panels. If people are attempting to discuss a general trend in fantasy books (or, presumably, sf books, horror books, fantasy art, sf art, etc.) which you feel you are personally an exception to? DO NOT DISMISS THE ENTIRE TREND AS THEREFORE NONEXISTANT OR A NON-ISSUE. You are not the be-all and end-all of Fantasy. No matter who you are. (And while George R.R. Martin once did this to a degree, I wouldn't have noticed as much had I not been sensitized to it by seeing it in others. The author who made the most blatant example of this was... not in that league for sales or reputation. Not a nobody, either, a decent-selling author with multiple books, but even so.)

- Not much real music: The one music related thing started off with a number of people doing Lord of the Rings filks to "Once More, with Feeling" tunes (The first "I'll never tell" variant, with Legolas and Gimli, was at least funny, and the girl Maja who sang Gollum's bit had a pretty good soprano, though she wobbled a bit without accompaniment. Then Martin Springett did a few songs, starting Lord of the Rings and wandering off into other territory. He's a truly talented guitarist, a decent singer, and a songwriter of some skill, though I have to admit, his style is not to my personal taste, so I'm not likely to buy a cd. But it broke up without ever opening up.

- I didn't practice nearly enough on the Angry Chicken, though I did get some practice time in. And I won't do much tonight, either, as I am tired and it is time to sleep. Sorry, Abacchus.
lenora_rose: (Archer)
Friday

Jane Yolen, general wandering, and mixed-up plans )

Saturday night I went to Prince Caspian with [livejournal.com profile] taleisin and Colin.

Movie review )

Yesterday I did a day pass to visit Keycon.

Panels and music. )
lenora_rose: (Archer)
Friday

Jane Yolen, general wandering, and mixed-up plans )

Saturday night I went to Prince Caspian with [livejournal.com profile] taleisin and Colin.

Movie review )

Yesterday I did a day pass to visit Keycon.

Panels and music. )

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